Mk 1 Project Zippy. Looking Like a Car.

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Re: Mk 1 Project Zippy. Looking Like a Car.

Postby Geoff Butcher » Sun Sep 09, 2018 8:53 pm

That's where I got mine from recently
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Re: Mk 1 Project Zippy. Looking Like a Car.

Postby fozzza » Mon Sep 10, 2018 3:11 pm

Geoff Butcher wrote:That's where I got mine from recently

That's good to know. You wouldn't happen to remember the part number just to confirm Im on the right track when I give them a call. As you now there is an awful lot of variants on their website.
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Re: Mk 1 Project Zippy. Looking Like a Car.

Postby johnnyfixit » Thu Sep 13, 2018 10:56 am

Geoff Butcher wrote:
Hi, Johnny,
They came from Gas Strut Engineering, cost for the pair was £53.21 inc VAT and carriage in 2015. From the bill the Product Description is 6-15-200-476-PC-PC-80N (2090 BB-80N). The bit in braclets is what's actually on the struts.

Regards,


I have emailed them twice now they don't seem to answer those, will ring them eventually when I get closer to needing them let me know how you get on.
Sorry Geoff I seem to have PM'ed the same message to your good self when I copy n pasted it my bad .
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Re: Mk 1 Project Zippy. Looking Like a Car.

Postby MrBounce » Sat Sep 29, 2018 2:43 pm

I have read somewhere that changing a master cylinder in a Mini is an absolute bar steward of a job, mainly due to the horrible job of removing the split pins from the little roll pins at the top of the pedal arms. In short, you have to put your head by the pedals and your legs go wherever you can place them, and then you try and work with your hands practically behind your head. In a stripped Midas, it is somewhat easier, mainly due to the nice flat floor, lack of seat and no carpet or underlay. My record for getting the old ones out when I stripped the car was about 6 minutes, which included me folding my chunky frame into the car in the first place. This was helped by the previous owner having used R clips. Although I have no aversion to them, I did want to replace them, and as I didn't have any new R clips, then split pins would have to do.

So, down to the job in hand: replacing the pedal box and popping the master cylinders back in. I like the arrangement I have on this Midas - a simply made captive plate on the engine side of the bulkhead with two welded bolts on it taking care of the mounting. Then it was "simply" a matter of pushing the studs up through the pre-drilled holes at the top before starting to add everything and tighten it down. This took some time, because if you're half a millimetre out, it won't go, no matter how much grunting, swearing and cursing you do. Eventually, after some interesting language and various scratches to my wrists and fingers, it was in place. I then set about sorting the master cylinders. Gaskets went on, followed by clutch and then brake MCs. The clutch MC was the same as before and went in easily. The brake MC is a brand new yellow tag item - I remembered this time to attach the pipes that go to the brake splitter on the bulkhead BEFORE bolting it down. The reason I changed the MC was that despite me refurbing my old MC, it wasn't working properly (pedal travel was very short and it locked up so I'd obviously done something wrong). I took the pedal box out because I needed longer bolts to mount the new one. The initial ones were too short and I had to modify the MC itself so I could mount it. I didn't want to break out the angle grinder with a new one hence the pedal box came out for the longer bolts. 10 more minutes and all was happily bolted up, including both sets of split pins. I also took the time to bolt in my now modified throttle pedal. This now clears the wheelarch properly - it's amazing what half an extra inch will do!

Having already broken one rear hatch hinge by accidentally knocking it off the bench, I didn't want to do it again, so I thought I had better chuck them on the car. I made up some rubber gaskets and simply bolted them on to the hatch area. Hopefully I will never have to move them again.

Brand new Yellow Tag in place.

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Throttle pedal bolted in and ready to go.

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Simple rubber gasket made up...

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...and hinges mounted.

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Re: Mk 1 Project Zippy. Looking Like a Car.

Postby MrBounce » Sat Oct 13, 2018 12:11 pm

This week I have learned a wonderful lesson in how to build a car: If there's anything that's going to be a bit difficult, do it BEFORE you start adding on bits that go around where you want this piece to be.

The item that I am talking about is of course the starter motor. Mine has sat on a shelf in a box for a significant amount of time, gone through a house move and I realised that getting it back on the car may be beneficial. Out came the masking tape and various bits of card so the important bits didn't get a layer or two of paint they didn't need, and on went some primer and satin black. Once dry, I then cleaned up the ends of it using brake cleaner and the remains of a Samuel L Jackson t-shirt.

It was when I went to fit the starter motor to the car that I started to use Mr Jackson's favourite word a lot. There was absolutely NO way that it would go anywhere near where it should be - neither from the top, or the bottom. So there was only one thing for it: Start taking bits off the car util I could get it in.

Top hose. Nope, not a hope in hell of it fitting.

Distributor cap. Nope. Angle all wrong and can't clear the (full) oil filter. Even with the rotor arm removed it wasn't enough.

Out came the 7/16" socket and off comes the distributor. I managed to wiggle the starter into place and with a further flourish of words Samuel L would have been proud of, I tightened up the bolts then re-added the distributor. It is at times like this that I wonder why I do this. Then something goes right again and I remember. Sense of achievement and all that. Onward!

Starter primed up and ready for paint.

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Panted, but not yet cleaned. It's a lot cleaner now, but I am NOT taking it out to show you.

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Finally fitted, half the car missing, new shiny bolts. And mutterings from Samuel.

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Re: Mk 1 Project Zippy. Looking Like a Car.

Postby MrBounce » Sat Oct 27, 2018 4:33 pm

A small but fairly useful update. Whilst removing half the car to fit the starter motor, I had a look at the top hose arrangement I had mocked up and thought "Nope - bin". The metal pipe, although nicely shaped and painted had all sorts of flaky bits going on inside and the hoses were just from a box of second hand spares I got when I bought the car so there was no way they were going to be permanently fitted - great for a mock up, not so much for using.

A few moments on the wonder that it the worldwide web and 2x 90 degree silicon hoses and a 300mm straight aluminium pipe were winging their way to my front door. After measuring up, one was trimmed to size and on they went. It's tidied it all up a bit and in theory there won't be any issues of deteriorating rubber, which seems to be de rigeur for car bits these days. Of course it was only after fitting one of the hose clips on the bench that I realised it will be impossible to undo on the car - a schoolboy error that will be corrected...

New hoses next to old painted metal pipe. They look much better.

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Here they are fitted to the car. Shortly before I realised they'd have to come off again... Doh!

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Re: Mk 1 Project Zippy. Looking Like a Car.

Postby MrBounce » Sun Dec 09, 2018 6:05 pm

Well it's been a while but I am now back in the Manroom. When I bought the Midas, it had at some point in its life been fitted with a Cooper S engine, and presumably some of the running gear which included the cylindrical SU fuel pump. Of course, by the time I got my grubby mitts on it, the S lump was long gone, as was the pump. The pump's bracket was an oddly home-made piece of bent metal which (I think) still resides in my "I'll use that one day" offcuts box. It was always my intention to use an electric pump, and I managed to get hold of a Facet Solid State pump at a good price. All I needed now was somewhere to mount it and an appropriate bracket.

My initial thought was to pop it right next to the tank but once I'd got the car up onto axle stands (haven't done that in a while...) it was clear that there was only enough room for a pump the size of couple of grapes. So I moved on to the "hump" where the token rear seats would have been. A suitable area was found and some CAD design produced with the help of a Jaffa Cake box. This was duplicated in steel, drilled and bent to shape. Drilling holes on the car for it would have taken 30 seconds, were it not for the bulb in the inspection lamp blowing. Twice. (once was down to me knocking it over). I like my inspection lamp (especially as it didn't cost anything), but the ease at which it blows bulbs (a gentle knock usually does the trick) will probably see me grabbing a new LED item for Xmas. I decided that after getting more than a little grumpy I had better take a few minutes' time out... (Mrs Bounce had heard me and came out to check that I hadn't injured myself - we have a detached garage so it must have been a bit loud!).

Once I had calmed myself by doing some odd jobs around the house including changing a blown light bulb (successfully and without breaking anything), I went back in and was SUPER careful with the lamp this time. Holes were successfully drilled and the pump was mounted at an angle as per fitting instructions. I will look into a small skid plate for it to prevent damage on speed humps, pothole, badgers etc.

I then took it all off again and rounded the corners on the bench grinder and drilled an additional hole in the bracket for the pump's wires to pass through. It currently is sitting in primer before I paint it and fit it.

Ain't no room here for a pump...

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Get pump, metal, Sharpie and Jaffa Cake box to make a template.

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Mocked up mounting everything together, including the bobbins.

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Glass fuel filter - plenty of space for this to go in now after the pump and before the main fuel line.

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Pump mounted on car. Protective skid plate is likely.

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Bracket trimmed and extra hole drilled...

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...and now in primer before paint.

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